Why the US’s chemicals industry is so vulnerable to Chinese pollution

Business Insider US chemicals producers are a major target for China’s growing pollution problem, as Beijing is ramping up its pollution output, the World Trade Organization (WTO) said on Tuesday.

The trade body said that the US industry’s trade deficit with China had risen from $9.3bn in 2013 to $24.3b in 2016.

China is the world’s biggest polluter, with an annual pollution output of more than 10 trillion tons of carbon dioxide.

Its pollution is expected to be around one-fifth of the world total by 2050.

“China is an economic engine of global growth and we must do everything we can to ensure its competitiveness in the global economy,” WTO Secretary-General Luis Almagro said.

“The US-China trade gap has grown from $8.9bn in 2012 to $23.5bn in 2016, and that has left our industry vulnerable to pollution by China’s factories and refineries.”

“This is a critical issue that must be addressed,” Almagros added.

“If not, the US and its partners will not be able to maintain the level of economic growth they have enjoyed in recent years.”

We will continue to work closely with the US on this issue.”WTO Trade Commissioner Robert Zoellick told the news conference that the Chinese economy is in a strong position to generate its own pollution and that it would be unfair to blame the US for this, which is a direct result of the US exporting large quantities of toxic chemicals to China.”

“There is no such thing as a ‘market price’ for these chemicals, as the US doesn’t have a single competitive supplier.””

Chinese authorities have accused the US of using the chemicals to make its own military aircraft and chemical components, and warned that Beijing will respond to any punitive measures.””

There is no such thing as a ‘market price’ for these chemicals, as the US doesn’t have a single competitive supplier.”

Chinese authorities have accused the US of using the chemicals to make its own military aircraft and chemical components, and warned that Beijing will respond to any punitive measures.

“If we have to impose tariffs on China to stop them from exporting chemicals, then China will respond,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said in a statement.